The Question of Animal Awareness

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The Question of Animal Awareness

Evolutionary Continuity of Mental Experience

By: Donald R. Griffin

Publication date: January 1982
SKU: 9780874700756
ISBN: 9780874700756
Subject: Animal Behavior

The Question of Animal Awareness was first published in 1976. Reaction was immediate and vociferous, ranging from unqualified endorsement to equally unqualified depreciation. The result? Professor Griffin has answered his critics in this revised and enlarged edition, in which he further elaborates on his theme that, by breaking old taboos, it should be possible to establish two-way communication with animals under study and so develop a truly experimental science of cognitive ethology.

Title information

The Question of Animal Awareness was first published in 1976. Reaction was immediate and vociferous, ranging from unqualified endorsement to equally unqualified depreciation. The result? Professor Griffin has answered his critics in this revised and enlarged edition, in which he further elaborates on his theme that, by breaking old taboos, it should be possible to establish two-way communication with animals under study and so develop a truly experimental science of cognitive ethology. He also engages in broad discussions of a number of challenging questions that either have been ignored or sidestepped by investigators in fields ranging from anthropology, ethology, and linguistics to psychology and zoology: Just how complex are animal communication systems? Are animals aware of what they are doing? Do they have mental images? Are human mental experiences the only kind that exist? Is language in truth a uniquely human characteristic?

Pages: 209
Language: English
Publisher: The Rockefeller University Press
Edition: Revised and Enlarged Edition
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Donald R. Griffin

Donald R. Griffin is probably best known for his studies on echolocation—a word he coined—whereby bats and other animals orient themselves and find food by listening to echoes of their own voices. He has been dubbed "the father of the field." Two of Griffin's books have been specially recognized for his ability to turn complex concepts into lucid and engaging prose: Listening in the Dark, which won the Elliott Medal of the National Academy of Sciences in 1961, and Bird Migration, which was awarded the Phi Beta Kappa Science Prize in 1966. He is also the author of other books and numerous scientific papers.